Help Us Save The Honey Bees 

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What is happening to the bees?

Honey bees are dying in alarming numbers due to pesticides, pests, lack of forage and diseases.  Beekeepers work endlessly trying to help the honey bees stay free from harmful parasites, like the Varroa mite, and to keep healthy, vibrant hives that can thrive. Lack of forage results from weed-free lawns and pesticide-heavy farming practices destroying the very food sources that the honey bees once fed upon.  

Image by Dustin Humes Honey bees collect pollen and bring it backl to the hive where it is transformed into honey.

How we are different?

By buying the end products of the honey bees, such as our pure, unfiltered, unpasteurized honey and natural beeswax products, you support a natural apiary that is designed to help keep the honey bees healthy and repopulating.  Our honey is not extracted at the expense of the honey bees. We take only the honey and beeswax that is not needed by the colony for their own use, and leave the wax foundation that they created so that they don't need to start from scratch.  Our goal is to keep the bee population growing for a mutually beneficial and productive future.

Thinking of becoming a beekeeper?

The beekeeping community is a collaborative one.  We suggest finding a beekeeping organization to join and learn from.  We highly recommend the Capital Area Beekeeper's Association.  For more information see cabapa.org.  You may also reach out to us directly if you are local.

Beekeeper and honey bee hive

What is our mission?

At Honey in the Hollow Bee Farm, our mission goes beyond producing a natural, wholesome product.  We organically manage our apiary hives promoting hive health, quality product and sustainability.

Image by USGS Honey bees make propolis, beeswax, honey and royal jelly which are all edible hive products.

Where can I learn more?

Visit www.planetbeefoundation.org for more information about how you can help save the bees

What should you do if you encounter a honey bee swarm?

Contact Honey in the Hollow if you are local, or contact a local beekeeper or beekeeper's club so it can be dealt with quickly. If they aren't captured, they won't survive more than a year on their own.

honey bees swarm because they overpopulate their hive.  Beekeepers help by retrieving them from inconvenient locations.